Wednesday, July 25, 2007

Family Carnival in aid of the Church of the Divine Mercy

After a lapse of thirty or more years (more if you don't count re-constructed Churches), a new Church is finally being built on the island of Penang. Although the land was donated decades ago, only now did the fates comes together to allow the construction of a Church, dedicated to the Divine Mercy.


What do you think? Chartres it is not, but as modern, new Churches go, it could have been much worse, like the new OL of Guadalupe Church in Puchong and the proposed Putrajaya Church. Modern looking, but keeping the traditional look of a Church and identifiable as such.




It's located in a very awkward looking plot of land, almost triangular in shape in a housing estate.




The Church seats about 552 persons in the nave and 216 in the loft. Not too bad.


There are also numerous classrooms, a multipurpose hall and quarters for the priests.







To raise funds for this new Church, a Family Carnival was held in the grounds of the Cathedral of the Holy Spirit, which is tasked to raise funds and see through the construction of this new Church, also known as the Sg. Ara Christian Community Centre.

I attended, with Mark. Adam and a couple of other friends were volunteering their services to man the stalls.

His Lordship Bishop Antony Selvanayagam of Penang consented to grace the occasion and officially launch the fair by cutting some ribbons and releasing the balloons bearing the carnival banner.

Bishop Antony unveiling the model of the new Church of the Divine Mercy. Fr. Francis Anthony, the Cathedral Administrator and his assistant Fr. Henry Rajoo (in cap) were also present with a Boys Brigade honour guard.

Bishop Selva with the organizing committee.

His Lordship, Bishop Selva looking at some plants.

"How much did you say that was?" His Lordship drives a hard bargain.

One of the BEC's or cell groups decked out in the same colour. Each of the stalls were manned by the Cathedral BEC's or ministries. Other parishes also participated.

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The crowd at the games tents.

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The crowd at one of the 2 food tents.

The other tent.

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After buying your food, you can enjoy it in the coolness of the air-conditioned Cathedral Hall where tables had been set out.
A general view of the hall.

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My parish was in charge of selling drinks, so here, we see some of the IC parishioners manning the one of the 4 drinks stalls.
There was food, glorious food everywhere!

Yummy, mouth watering Indian curries.

Desserts and treats!

Satay, or marinated meat slowly roasting over an open fire. Mr Peter Gan, the roaster, was formerly advisor of the Catholic Youth Group at my college.

Burgers and hot dogs! Yum..

A chef busy at work preparing her delights.

Pre-packed food for patrons on the go.

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The Little Sisters of the Poor not wanting to miss out on the action.


The Boys Brigade volunteers did an excellent job. They were assigned to collect the used plates and cups from the diners in the Hall. They did such an excellent job that oftentimes, they'll grab a plate or cup right out of your hand! =)

Fr. FA mingling with the people.

Hand painting. One of the many fun activities on offer.
Face painting too.

A clown was there to entertain the kids as well with his antics and little balloon animals..

A model of the proposed new Church of the Divine Mercy. That's what it's all about.

Fr. FA trying his luck at the lucky dip. If you're lucky, you'd be very clean as soap featured prominently as the most common gift.

I'll leave you with this image of Kebabs on a stick. Mmmm... Cya...

7 comments:

John said...

Hooray!

Looks better than most Catholic Churches over here...

*mumbles jealously*

Si Fractus Fortis said...

Yes, much better.

In England we have a saying "If you want to find the Catholic Church look for the ugliest building in town - it'll either be the church or the town swimming pool."

Joee Blogs said...

We have little sisters of the poor in london, they're excellent - have a traditional habit - the same one the 2 nuns you have pictured have. And they look after old and retired priests and religious, which is a valuable apostolate I think.
Nice pics Andrew!

Mrs Jackie Parkes MJ said...

What an amazing part of the world you live in! The pictures are always breathtaking..God bless

Jeffrey Smith said...

Very good design. Any idea of what the interior will be like?

Jack Said said...

hahaha...i have always thought the european cathedrals were breathtaking, now our westerner frens are admiring our church buildings. But yeah, the new building is nice, though i still wish we have more significance imbued into the architecture (like the cruciform). And your festive pics are cool. we do know how to berpesta

Andrew said...

John and SFF, I can assure you that this is one of the better designs. There are some real ugly ones as well, so England does not have the monopoly on that =)

Joee, the Sisters also take care of the retired priests here. Great and wonderful people.

Jeffrey, given the space constraints and Muslim requirements and sensitivities, I have to agree that it's rather good, given the circumstances and finances. Sorry, but I haven't the foggiest what the inside is going to look like. From the plans, it looks like an elevated sanctuary area but that's kinda it. I'm still hoping that they'll some some wonders inside though, although the priests in charge I have spoken to don't seem as keen on Baroque as I am =)

Jack, I have always believed that beauty is universal and timeless. The Cathedrals of Europe as well as the great wonders of the world testify to this. Unfortunately, the things built from the 60's to the 80's, though they might appear hip and trendy then, look so dated and frozen in their time now. Hopefully this new Church will be timeless as well.