Tuesday, December 26, 2006

Christmas around the world

A look at how Christmas is celebrated around the world.

Catholic Coptic Christians celebrate Christmas mass in Cairo December 25, 2006. REUTERS/Nasser Nuri (EGYPT)

Indonesian Christians hold candles during a Christmas mass at Bethany church in Surabaya, east Java, December 24, 2006. Jakarta deployed about 18,000 police and 2,000 soldiers across the capital and its outskirts ahead of Christmas, a senior official said. Picture taken December 24, 2006. REUTERS/Sigit Pamungkas (INDONESIA)

Women burn candles in front of a statue of the Virgin Mary during Christmas in Srinagar December 25, 2006. REUTERS/Fayaz Kabli (INDIAN ADMINISTERED KASHMIR)

An Iraqi Christian kisses the hand of a priest after attending Christmas mass in a church in Baghdad, Iraq, Monday, Dec. 25, 2006. Most of Iraq's Christians, who make up for three percent of the country's 26 million people, chose to celebrate the holiday behind the closed doors of their homes fearing sectarian attacks, while others attended the Christmas service in churches in small numbers. (AP Photo/Karim Kadim)

The head of the Bosnian Catholic church Cardinal Vinko Puljic (C) leads the Christmas morning prayers in the central Sarajevo cathedral December 25, 2006. REUTERS/ Danilo Krstanovic (BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA)

Christian children hold candles during a Christmas mass at a church in Basra, 550 km (340 miles) south of Baghdad, December 25, 2006. REUTERS/Atef Hassan (IRAQ)

Britain's Queen Elizabeth II, receives flowers from young well-wishers, as she leaves St Mary Magdalene's church after the Royal Family's Christmas Day service on the Sandringham estate in eastern England December 25, 2006. REUTERS/Alessia Pierdomenico (BRITAIN)

Bishop Franjo Komarica prays during a morning Christmas mass in Banja Luka December 25, 2006. Bosnian Croats living in Banja Luka celebrated mass in the Church of St Boniventura. REUTERS/Ranko Cukovic (BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA)

Indian Christian women sing during Christmas prayers at a church in Ahmadabad, India, Monday, Dec. 25, 2006. Though the Hindus and Muslims comprise majority of the population in India, Christmas is celebrated with much fanfare. (AP Photo/Ajit Solanki)


Pakistani Christians attend a Christmas mass at a cathedral, Monday, Dec. 25, 2006 in Lahore, Pakistan. Pakistani Christians, who account for about 3.8 million of Pakistan's 140 million people, celebrate Christmas amid lingering fears of attacks by radical Muslims. Security has been tightened around churches in the capital and other cities where Christians attended Christmas ceremonies. (AP Photo/K M Chaudary)

Catholic clergy take part in a procession outside the Church of Nativity in the West Bank town of Bethlehem December 24, 2006. Hundreds of pilgrims celebrated Christmas in Bethlehem on Monday but Palestinian residents said there was little cause for holiday cheer in the town Christians revere as the birthplace of Jesus. REUTERS/Eliana Aponte

Lithuanian Christians attend a Christmas mass at the Gates of Dawn Chapel in Vilnius, Lithuania, Monday, Dec 25, 2006. (AP Photo/Mindaugas Kulbis)

A nun prays at a cathedral in Denpasar on the Indonesian resort island of Bali. In Indonesia, Christmas services were held without incident as some 18,000 police and troops guarded churches and mosques across Jakarta amid warnings from Australia and the United States of possible attacks.(AFP/Sonny Tumbelaka)

Pakistani Christians gather after attending a Christmas mass outside the Sacred Heart Cathedral Church in Lahore. Pakistan's President Pervez Musharraf vowed in a Christmas message that minorities were free to profess and practice their religions and the government would "safeguard their legitimate interests" in the country.(AFP/Arif Ali)

Christians hold candles during Christmas mass at a stadium in Jakarta December 25, 2006. Jakarta is deploying about 18,000 police and 2,000 soldiers across the capital and its outskirts ahead of Christmas, a senior official said. REUTERS/Dadang Tri (INDONESIA)

Christians wave during Christmas mass at a stadium in Jakarta December 25, 2006. Jakarta is deploying about 18,000 police and 2,000 soldiers across the capital and its outskirts ahead of Christmas, a senior official said. REUTERS/Dadang Tri (INDONESIA)

Syria's President Bashar al-Assad (front row, C) poses for a photograph with religious men during his visit to the Patriarchy to celebrate Christmas Day in Damascus December 25, 2006. REUTERS/Khaled al-Hariri (SYRIA)

Orthodox Patriarch Hazim (L) talks to Syria's President Bashar al-Assad (2nd L) during al-Assad's visit to the Patriarchy to celebrate Christmas Day with religious men in Damascus December 25, 2006. Listening are Syria's mufti Ahmad Hassoun (2nd R) and Patriarch for Antioch and the East Zakka the first Iwaz. REUTERS/Khaled al-Hariri (SYRIA)

The Latin Patriarch of Jerusalem Michel Sabbah (C) carries a Jesus Christ figurine in the Church of the Nativity in Bethlehem on December 24. The world's Christian leaders have used their Christmas sermons to urge an end to bloodshed in the Middle East amid protracted stalemate in the Israeli-Palestinian peace process.(AFP/Musa Al-Shaer)

Iraqi Christians pray during Christmas morning mass at the Chaldean Mariam Al-Azara Church in Baghdad. The world's Christian leaders have used their Christmas sermons to urge an end to bloodshed in the Middle East amid protracted stalemate in the Israeli-Palestinian peace process.(AFP/Ali Al-Saadi)

An Iraqi man prays before a statue of the Virgin Mary during Christmas morning mass at the Catholic church in the central Baghdad Karrada neighbourhood.(AFP/Ahmad al-Rubaye)

Hanoi Archbishop Ngo Quang Kiet(C) leaves Hanoi cathedral after celebrating the Christmas mass.(AFP/Hoang Dinh Nam)

Pakistani Christians pray during a Christmas mass at Faima Church in Islamabad December 25, 2006. REUTERS/Mian Khursheed (PAKISTAN)

Michel Sabbah, the Latin patriarch of Jerusalem, leads the Christmas mass at the Nativity Church in Bethlehem. Sabbah has condemned the recent infighting among Palestinians during his Christmas sermon in Christ's birthplace in Bethlehem.(AFP/Musa Al-Shaer)

A family looks through their presents below a large Christmas decoration in the Zocalo plaza in Mexico City on Christmas Day Monday, Dec. 25, 2006. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)

Peace activists and local residents of Beit Sahur, a Palestinian town near the biblical West Bank city of Bethlehem, attend a torch march asking for peace and against Israeli occupation. Christian leaders in Christmas messages urged an end to bloodshed in the Middle East, but violence rumbled on with rockets in Gaza and bombs in Baghdad.(AFP/Musa al-Shaer)

Catholics leave Hanoi's cathedral after taking part in a Christmas mass. Christian leaders in Christmas messages urged an end to bloodshed in the Middle East, but violence rumbled on with rockets in Gaza and bombs in Baghdad.(AFP/Hoang Dinh Nam)

Christians pray after taking part in the Christmas mass at a church in Kuala Lumpur. Christian leaders in Christmas messages urged an end to bloodshed in the Middle East, but violence rumbled on with rockets in Gaza and bombs in Baghdad.(AFP/Teh Eng Koon)

Iraqi women attend Christmas morning mass at the Catholic church in the central Baghdad Karrada neighbourhood. Christian leaders in Christmas messages urged an end to bloodshed in the Middle East, but violence rumbled on with rockets in Gaza and bombs in Baghdad.(AFP/Ahmad al-Rubaye)

2 comments:

Joee Blogs said...

Brilliant post Andrew, many thanks!

Andrew said...

You're most welcome. =)

It's interesting to take a moment away from our celebrations and see how the rest of the world celebrates.

What a contrast between the joy on the looks of some and the despair on others. But in all the faces there shines hope, borne out of the coming of Jesus.

Merry Christmas!